Government Surveillance

New technologies have given governments around the world unprecedented means to collect and access personal information. This includes law enforcement agencies demanding content from tech companies, intelligence agencies tapping directly into internet cables, and the use of surveillance technologies such as license plate readers or facial recognition cameras.

Much of this government surveillance is aimed at enhancing national security and safety, yet in order to ensure all people can seek information and express themselves freely, there must be reasonable checks and balances on governments’ ability to access, collect, and store individuals’ data. Both security and freedom can be protected, but only through balanced laws and policies that uphold human rights.

Government Surveillance Topics

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CDT joins EFF and other groups in filing an amicus brief urging the U.S. Supreme Court to review warrantless video surveillance in the case, Tuggle v. United States. White document on a dark grey background.

CDT Joins Groups in Filing Amicus Brief Urging Supreme Court to Review Warrantless Video Surveillance in Tuggle v. United States

CDT's Sharon Bradford Franklin penned a post about surveillance reform on the 20th anniversary of the passage of the Patriot Act. The post is on Just Security, entitled "Rethinking Surveillance on the 20th Anniversary of the Patriot Act." White text on top of a photograph of the presidential signing of the Patriot Act.

Just Security: Rethinking Surveillance on the 20th Anniversary of the Patriot Act

This is a screenshot of a CDT issue brief, entitled "Recognizing the Threats: Congress Must Impose a Moratorium on Law Enforcement Use of Facial Recognition Tech." White document on a dark grey background.

Recognizing the Threats: Congress Must Impose a Moratorium on Law Enforcement Use of Facial Recognition Tech

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