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How Can We Protect Privacy While Supporting Students Who Change Schools?

Changing schools can be disruptive to a student’s education. One way schools and parents can help limit this disruption is by making sure that important data follows students as they change schools. However, data portability has to be done carefully and conscientiously, because the same data that can help students hit the ground running at their new school can also hinder them there.

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Privacy Professionals Reflect on the GDPR One Year Later

It has been approximately one year since the European General Data Protection Regulation went into effect, and privacy professionals around the world continue to grapple with its impact. Recently, the CDT Europe team had the opportunity to participate in two events geared towards privacy professionals that looked at what has been accomplished under GDPR and what gaps still exist.

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Standards for Artificial Intelligence Can Shape a More Secure and Equitable Future

Artificial intelligence today is exceedingly powerful. As its capabilities continue to grow, so too does public excitement and government interest in setting standards that will allow artificial intelligence to flourish. In this post, we’ll first discuss the landscape of AI and then how standards for AI might help government, business, research, and society better grapple with an automated future.

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Georgia’s Governor Vetoes Harmful School Safety Bill

The vetoing of the SB 15 bill gives the legislature a chance to reconsider how using data and technology to implement overbroad surveillance measures in schools could undermine the goal of keeping all students safe. CDT has highlighted what is missing from the school safety conversation, so it is our hope that the legislators will take this chance to focus on proven school safety strategies that consider the interests of all students.

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CBP Letter Prompts the Question: Is DHS Criminalizing Compassion and Association?

Authorities at the U.S. border are arguing that journalists who report on asylum seekers, and the lawyers and activists who advise them, are legitimate targets for investigation under 8 U.S. Code §1324 for the crime of illegally “encouraging” aliens to cross the border unlawfully. This alleged crime justifies the targeting of these individuals for surveillance, and may be tied to the search and detention of their electronic devices at ports of entry. That’s the message U.S. Customs and Border Protection delivered in a May 9th letter to the Center for Democracy & Technology, which responded to the coalition letter we sent the Department of Homeland Security about a pattern of enforcement activity that appears to target journalists, lawyers and activists associated with asylum seekers.

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