Related Posts

FBI Guidelines Makeover in the Making

The Department of Justice is about to issue new Attorney General Guidelines that govern FBI criminal and intelligence investigations. The new Guidelines would reportedly weaken the standards in existing Guidelines for use of some intrusive investigative techniques. Currently, the FBI has to have “reasonable suspicion” of criminality to open a full criminal investigation and it has to have…

Read More

CRS Report of the Week: The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act: A Sketch of Selected Issues

This report was prepared and published prior to the Senate passing of FISA. CRS Report RL34566, July 7, 2008. From the report’s summary: The current legislative and oversight activity with respect to electronic surveillance under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) has drawn national attention to several overarching issues. This report briefly…

Read More

More on YouTube v. Viacom v. User Privacy

There is more to say, in addition to what David Sohn pointed out in Thursday’s blog post, about the recent court order requiring YouTube to turn over user information. The order directing YouTube to turn over information about anyone who has ever used YouTube illustrates two points: (1) Google (which now runs YouTube) and other Internet and…

Read More

Charter-ing a New Course in Behavioral Targeting

This week broadband provider Charter Communications revealed its plans to begin sharing its customers’ Web traffic with NebuAd, an advertising network. NebuAd’s service works by monitoring individuals’ online activities and creating profiles of those individuals’ interests. NebuAd then uses the profiles to serve targeted advertisements on the Web. Charter, with over 5…

Read More

DHS Can’t Admit Its Own Mistakes

Back in April, I blogged about how Department of Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff was “dead wrong” when he testified before the Senate that personal information can’t be “skimmed” from an unencrypted barcode, which all driver’s licenses will have under the REAL ID program. Chertoff completely denied that there are any privacy risks associated with the REAL ID…

Read More

Chertoff’s Defense of REAL ID is “Dead Wrong”

Department of Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff has a hard job. Among other things, it’s his responsibility to make sure that our country isn’t attacked by terrorists and that undocumented immigrants don’t cross our borders. So it’s understandable when he vociferously defends his Department’s efforts at “protecting the homeland.” But it’s inexcusable when the guy is simply…

Read More

National Privacy Standards Needed for America’s “Cammed Nation”

Washington, D.C. recently joined the club of cities, including Chicago, San Francisco, New York, Baltimore, and Philadelphia, that conduct live monitoring of citizens through closed circuit television cameras (CCTV). Hundreds of millions of dollars granted by the Department of Homeland Security to state and local governments has greatly expanded the use of CCTV in the U.S. since 2001….

Read More

The Truth about (Telecom) Immunity

Administration officials are complaining about House Democrats stalling legislation that would grant immunity to any telecommunications carrier that assisted with its domestic spying program. Without that immunity cloak, the White House says, telecoms will hesitate to cooperate with such programs in the future. It’s true that telecom assistance is crucial to successful electronic surveillance. But what’s getting lost in…

Read More