Related Press Releases

European Net Neutrality Legislation is a Step Forward but Significant Questions Remain

Today, the European Parliament voted to pass the proposed Telecommunications Single Market Regulation. The Regulation includes a set of provisions to safeguard non-discrimination of traffic on the Internet. It provides a legal basis for European regulators to ensure that telecommunications operators and ISPs do not prioritise and discriminate between different content and applications.

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Passage of Judicial Redress Act a Small Victory for Global Privacy Rights

Today, the House of Representatives passed the Judicial Redress Act (JRA), which extends some protections in the Privacy Act to some non-US citizens. The JRA specifically addresses records shared by European Union and otherwise-designated countries with US government agencies for the purpose of investigating, detecting, or prosecuting criminal offenses. Enactment of the Judicial Redress Act would represent a modest step forward for the privacy rights of non-US persons.

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Top European court rules that NSA spying makes U.S. unsafe for data

Intercept: Although the safe harbor provision applies to commercial data, the underlying issue is the overbroad access of U.S. intelligence agencies to European citizens data, said Jens-Henrik Jeppesen, director of European Affairs for the Center for Democracy and Technology. “Surveillance is the heart of this matter,” Jeppesen told The Intercept. “The highest court in the European Union is not satisfied with the guarantees such as they are under current U.S. laws.”

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Top E.U. court strikes down major data sharing pact between U.S. and Europe

Washington Post: “Today’s ruling shows the need to step up reforms of government surveillance practices. There is a clear need for the U.S. and Europe to set clear, lawful and proportionate standards and safeguards for conducting surveillance for national security purposes,” said Jens Henrik-Jeppesen, director of European Affairs for the Center for Democracy and Technology.

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EU Safe Harbour Ruling Should Reinvigorate Surveillance Reform Efforts

In a ruling that will reverberate across the tech sector and other industries in both the United States and Europe, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) ruled that the EU-US Safe Harbour agreement is invalid. The ruling, which is mostly a response to revelations about the US Government’s surveillance practices, complicates the legal framework for companies that transfer their users’ data under the agreement and should generate a new round of surveillance reform efforts in both the US and Europe.

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Strike Down Safe Harbour, Says CJEU Advocate General

Today, the Advocate General of the Court of Justice of the European Union concluded that the EU should suspend the Safe Harbour agreement it has with the United States. The Advocate General’s opinion turned on the vast scope of NSA surveillance. CDT shares in the Advocate General’s conclusion that US surveillance programmes violate the privacy rights of EU citizens, and recognises that suspension of data transfers under the Safe Harbour would do little or nothing to enhance protection against indiscriminate collection of data by security agencies.

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CDT Supports Microsoft’s Appeal to Government Demand for Data Stored Abroad

Today, a federal appeals court in Manhattan heard oral arguments in Microsoft’s challenge to the US government’s warrant to compel the company to disclose a customer’s email stored in a data center in Ireland. The Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT) believes that neither a warrant nor a subpoena is sufficient to reach data stored outside the US and sides with Microsoft in the case.

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