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Cloud Act Implementation Issues

The CLOUD Act, which became law in March 2018, will pose a number of implementation challenges to the U.S. Department of Justice. Here are 11 key issues that the DOJ will have to face in connection with its implementation of the CLOUD Act.

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New Voting System Vulnerabilities in Congo

The Sentry, an NGO that works to prevent genocide and mass atrocities in Africa, released a detailed analysis of the new system slated for use in the upcoming elections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The Sentry worked with Argentinian security researchers Javier Smaldone and Alfredo Ortega and CDT Chief Technologist Joseph Lorenzo Hall to examine what little public information is available about this system. The verdict is not good. A lot of unanswered questions should be addressed before it can be used safely in DRC elections.

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Tech Talk: Habeas Data and the Future of Work

In this episode of Tech Talk, we talking to Cyrus Farivar of Ars Technica about his new book Habeas Data, where he takes a close look at the legal cases and policies that are shaping American surveillance practices. After that, we welcome Aaron Pinto, a Canadian delegate to the G7 youth summit or Y7 who shared his insights on the future of work, highlighting how young leaders from the G7 countries see technology impacting their future.

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State Department Should Abandon Its Plan to Collect Social Media Information From 14.7 Million Visa Applicants

In March the State Department issued a notice proposing that all immigrant and nonimmigrant visa applicants be required to provide their social media identifiers “for identity resolution and vetting purposes.” CDT filed comments opposing this latest social media information request, and highlighted that it would chill free speech, fail to detect threats, and lead to unintentionally incomplete applications, adverse determinations, and problematic algorithmic screening.

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Oakland Shows Leadership in Passing Strong Surveillance Law

Ubiquitous surveillance has the potential to chill speech, limit our freedom of association, and disrupt the personal boundaries we should enjoy, even while in public. The city of Oakland recognized this and has demonstrated great leadership in recently passing a strong surveillance oversight law. The law gives fundamental oversight abilities to Oakland citizens for the technology that could be used by the government to monitor them.

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Courts Step in to Protect Constitutional Rights at the Border

Twice this week courts have pushed back against suspicionless, warrantless searches of digital devices at the border, in Alassad v. Neilsen in the First Circuit and United States v. Kolsuz in the Fourth Circuit. In both cases plaintiffs argued that warrantless searches of their digital devices at the border violated their Fourth Amendment rights. Alassad survived a motion to dismiss and the the federal appellate court in Kolsuz determined that under the Fourth Amendment, U.S. border authorities cannot search travelers’ cell phones and other electronic devices without individualized suspicion of wrongdoing.

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