Related Press Releases

Passing Through Airport Security With the Touch of a Finger

New York Times: A company called Clear is using fingerprints and iris scans to spare some passengers the first phase of the T.S.A.’s security airport screening process — the document-verification checkpoint and its line. Clear says it can speed fliers through checkpoints while maintaining tight security. But the rollout process has been slow — Clear is available only in some terminals at 24 domestic airports — an earlier iteration of the company had a data security issue.

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Senators Lee and Leahy Introduce Bold Bill to Protect Privacy in the Digital Age

Today, Senators Mike Lee (R-UT) and Patrick Leahy (D-VT) introduced the ECPA Modernization Act of 2017, legislation that would modernize the privacy laws that protect the digital communications of all Americans. The bill, which would fundamentally reform the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, is more comprehensive than previous reform efforts. CDT has been a leading advocate for major ECPA reform to protect privacy in the digital age and strongly supports this bipartisan legislation.

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After London attacks, British prime minister calls for worldwide Internet regulations to fight terrorism

Washington Post: “May’s government now has incredible compulsory powers to do both targeted and bulk surveillance in her country,” said Michelle Richardson, deputy director of the Center for Democracy and Technology, a Washington-based think tank. “The only thing left you could seem to grab would be a complete surveillance state. If you’re proposing to go even further than the current authority, there’s not much you could do beyond that that isn’t an explicit attack on human rights.”

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NSA Halts Part of Invasive Surveillance Program, Need for Section 702 Reform Highlighted

The NSA is stopping a controversial part of its warrantless surveillance conducted under Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), which permits the targeting of non-U.S. persons outside the U.S. It reportedly abandoned the practice of collecting communications that merely mention an identifier associated with a target, such as an email address or telephone number. This “about” collection swept in many communications that involved Americans. NSA will continue to collect communications to which the target is actually a party. CDT has advocated against this form of untargeted surveillance.

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