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“Hacking Back” a Recipe for Digital Arms Race

“Malicious hacking”—using technological means to penetrate or manipulate the networks, data, or devices of others without permission is a threat to the Internet and to the health of the Internet infrastructure companies that serve as its backbone. “Hacking back” would make us all more vulnerable to more sophisticated and frequent attacks. Our focus should be on protecting networks from intrusion, rather than making them more vulnerable by turning the Internet ecosystem into a digital war zone.

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Why the FTC Shouldn't Be the Only "Cop On the Beat"

As the internet has become more ubiquitous and users generate more valuable data, we have been forced consider how much privacy we are entitled to from private parties like internet service providers. Under former Chairman Tom Wheeler, the FCC answered this question through the Broadband Privacy Order in October 2016. But the order was recently repealed, and FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has suggested completely ceding oversight of consumer privacy to the FTC in his Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM). CDT has stated its opposition to previous efforts to roll back consumer privacy protections, and in this post, we will outline the basis for some of our concerns.

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Rules of the Road: Net Neutrality’s Bright Line Protections

Broadly speaking, net neutrality rules are the protections that internet users have in their relationship with ISPs. In this context, the rules could be thought of as a Bill of Rights for users, enumerating fundamental individual rights that cannot be infringed upon by ISPs. As defined by the FCC, the three bright-line rules are as follows: No Blocking. No Throttling. No Paid Prioritization.

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Three Core Security & Privacy Issues of Connected Vehicles

Connected vehicles have tremendous potential to reshape the transportation landscape – bringing important safety and efficiency benefits but also creating new security and privacy risks. In addition, there are long-standing security and privacy issues that, if not resolved, will be compounded with the continued trends towards greater use of software and connectivity in motor vehicles. Our comments focus on three main issues: the need for secure software, the increasing dependence on critical information infrastructures, and the need for greater transparency around data privacy.

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“The Cyber” Part IV: Are There Appropriate Ethical Limits on Hacking?

How far is too far? We’ve been asking this question over and over again at CDT while conducting interviews of security researchers and in drafting CDT’s new white paper that surveys “hard questions” in the world of computer security research. Through these conversations, we are developing a basic set of ethical spectra – essentially, axes along which security research activities become more or less ethically questionable. In this white paper, we note a few possible options for better mapping the ethical landscape of the security research world.

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