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DOJ Writes to Copyright Office: Security Research is Cool.

On June 28, the Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section (CCIPS) of the Department of Justice voiced its support for CDT’s request that the Copyright Office expand an exemption under Section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act that allows computer security researchers to find and repair flaws and vulnerabilities in programs without running afoul of copyright law. We hope the Office will give the CCIPS letter due consideration as it prepares its recommendations for the next round of exemptions.

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Congress Has a Chance to Get It Right on Email Privacy

Congress has an opportunity to finally put to bed one of the longest running but seemingly least controversial issues in tech policy: what do police need to do to access private communications held by third parties? The language of the Email Privacy Act, which would address this, has been included in the House (but not the Senate) version of must pass legislation, the National Defense Authorization Act. Let’s get it done.

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Cloud Act Implementation Issues

The CLOUD Act, which became law in March 2018, will pose a number of implementation challenges to the U.S. Department of Justice. Here are 11 key issues that the DOJ will have to face in connection with its implementation of the CLOUD Act.

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New Voting System Vulnerabilities in Congo

The Sentry, an NGO that works to prevent genocide and mass atrocities in Africa, released a detailed analysis of the new system slated for use in the upcoming elections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The Sentry worked with Argentinian security researchers Javier Smaldone and Alfredo Ortega and CDT Chief Technologist Joseph Lorenzo Hall to examine what little public information is available about this system. The verdict is not good. A lot of unanswered questions should be addressed before it can be used safely in DRC elections.

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Tech Talk: Habeas Data and the Future of Work

In this episode of Tech Talk, we talking to Cyrus Farivar of Ars Technica about his new book Habeas Data, where he takes a close look at the legal cases and policies that are shaping American surveillance practices. After that, we welcome Aaron Pinto, a Canadian delegate to the G7 youth summit or Y7 who shared his insights on the future of work, highlighting how young leaders from the G7 countries see technology impacting their future.

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State Department Should Abandon Its Plan to Collect Social Media Information From 14.7 Million Visa Applicants

In March the State Department issued a notice proposing that all immigrant and nonimmigrant visa applicants be required to provide their social media identifiers “for identity resolution and vetting purposes.” CDT filed comments opposing this latest social media information request, and highlighted that it would chill free speech, fail to detect threats, and lead to unintentionally incomplete applications, adverse determinations, and problematic algorithmic screening.

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