Related Press Releases

Unintentional Bias May Impede Effectiveness of Health Apps

The mobile health industry holds significant potential to improve health and wellness, but unintended bias in the algorithms and data that power mHealth apps might limit their effectiveness and uptake, especially for traditionally marginalized communities, according to Heal-gorithms, a new report from CDT.

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Elizabeth Laird to Lead CDT’s Expanded Student Privacy Advocacy

CDT is excited to welcome Elizabeth Laird as Senior Fellow to lead its Student Privacy Project. Elizabeth will help expand CDT’s efforts on student privacy, working to advance strong privacy practices and policies that protect the rights of students and families. The Student Privacy Project will leverage CDT’s existing expertise on privacy and data issues, with an initial focus on digital decision-making and data portability, deletion, and integration.

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Instagram Account That Sought Harassment Tales May Be Unmasked

New York Times: “The reason that people are making these sorts of accounts anonymously is because of the fear of reprisal that they face — that’s a key part of why we have a First Amendment right to anonymous speech,” Emma Llansó said. “On the other hand, defamation and untrue statements that are damaging to people’s reputations are also something our laws protect against.”

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Supreme Court Rules on Location Privacy

The Supreme Court ruled that law enforcement officers must have a warrant in order to obtain historic cell site location information. In one of the most widely-anticipated decisions in a blockbuster year for the Supreme Court, the Court found 5-4 in Carpenter v. U.S. that collecting 127 days of cell site location information requires a warrant. The Court rejected the government’s argument that the third-party doctrine, which holds that an individual loses Fourth Amendment protections in data voluntarily shared with a third party, nullified the warrant requirement.

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Apple's Health App Update Makes Keeping Track of Your Medical Records Way Easier

SELF: Apple’s most recent release, iOS 11.3 beta, includes a major addition to the Apple Health app: a Health Records feature that lets customers pull up their medical records on their phones whenever they want. Per the press release from Apple, the data will be encrypted and protected via the passcode on your phone. But Michelle De Mooy tells SELF that even with these measures, it’s “not possible” for Apple (or any company) to mitigate every security risk that accompanies this kind of data storage.

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