Related Press Releases

Who Is Responsible for Stopping Live-Streamed Crimes?

NBC: Social media companies can do better by clearly highlighting “report abuse” buttons and by training their employees very clearly on a protocol when things like crimes are flagged, said Emma Llansó, director of the Free Expression project at the Center for Democracy and Technology. But that system only works if users use those functions and actually flag, she said.

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Coalition Condemns DHS Proposal to Demand Passwords to Enter the U.S.

In a statement released today, a broad coalition rejected the idea proposed by DHS Secretary John Kelly that DHS could begin requiring visa applicants from certain countries to provide social media account passwords as a condition of entering the U.S. The practice of demanding social media passwords on visa application forms, which Secretary Kelly raised at a hearing before the House Homeland Security Committee on February 7th, 2017, would not increase the security of U.S. citizens and would jeopardize the fundamental rights of people in the U.S. and abroad.

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Ruling in Microsoft's Challenge to Gag Order a Win for Transparency

Today, Microsoft’s effort to alert customers when they are the subject of searches by the government took a crucial step forward. Judge James Robart denied the government’s motion to dismiss the case, and allowed Microsoft to assert its claim that the government stifled the company’s First Amendment rights when it applied a “gag” order to stop them from sharing…

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EU Squanders Opportunity to Modernise Copyright Rules

Today, the European Commission released its much anticipated legislation for copyright reforms in the EU as part of the Digital Single Market strategy. As previously leaked drafts suggested, the proposals contain major flaws and represent a significant step backwards. CDT has advocated for a progressive, innovation-friendly, and flexible copyright regime in the EU. This is not what the Commission is proposing today.

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Overreaching Judicial Order Blocks WhatsApp in Brazil

Today, a judge in Brazil issued an order to immediately and indefinitely block access to the popular WhatsApp end-to-end encrypted messaging service in Brazil. For each day that it does not comply with the judicial order, WhatsApp faces fines of 50,000 reais (about $15,300). It is judicial overreach and a violation of free expression rights to deprive Brazilians of their preferred communications channel, and CDT applauds WhatsApp for continuing to provide a secure means of communication to its billions of users worldwide.

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