Related Press Releases

CDT Continues to Challenge the FCC to Restore Net Neutrality to America

CDT filed a brief defending American’s net neutrality in Mozilla v. FCC. The brief is part of the first wave of arguments in the litigation challenging the validity of the Commission’s 2017 order “Restoring Internet Freedom,” which removed the strong net neutrality protections put in place by the previous administration’s Open Internet Order. CDT believes both the procedure and substance of the Commission’s efforts to repeal those rules are invalid.

Read More

First Republican Announces Support for Reinstatement of Net Neutrality Rules

Today, Congressman Mike Coffman of from the 6th District of Colorado announced his support for restoring net neutrality protections for consumers. Coffman is the first Republican member of the House to signal his support for utilizing the Congressional Review Act (CRA) to reverse the FCC’s repeal of the effective Open Internet Order. The Senate has already passed the CRA to restore the net neutrality rules.

Read More

Instagram Account That Sought Harassment Tales May Be Unmasked

New York Times: “The reason that people are making these sorts of accounts anonymously is because of the fear of reprisal that they face — that’s a key part of why we have a First Amendment right to anonymous speech,” Emma Llansó said. “On the other hand, defamation and untrue statements that are damaging to people’s reputations are also something our laws protect against.”

Read More

FBI’s “Going Dark” Claims Now Even More Dubious

Is strong encryption causing the FBI to “go dark”, blocking access to evidence from criminal investigations? That claim has long been dubious, and a new report from the Washington Post, confirming that that FBI inflated the number of locked devices it cannot open by at least 4x, makes the claim even less credible. CDT advocates for strong encryption to keep our daily communications secure and protect information and networks across sectors.

Read More

Pennsylvania race shows need for U.S. voting machine upgrades: experts

Reuters: “With paper, you can recount or audit that paper and carefully check the performance of the voting system, ensuring that the electronic result would match what a full hand count would show. Without a paper audit trail, any recount is just like hitting enter on the keyboard over and over again: You get the same answer and you have no clue if that answer is correct,” said Joseph Lorenzo Hall, an election security expert with the Center for Democracy & Technology.

Read More

Secure Elections Act Would Help Safeguard Our Democracy

Today, the Secure Elections Act, which would greatly improve the security of the U.S. election system, was introduced. This bipartisan bill would streamline information sharing, establish an election cybersecurity federal advisory panel, provide grants to improve cybersecurity and modernize election systems, as well as establish a vulnerability hunting program for election equipment and infrastructure. CDT supports the Secure Elections Act and believes it is a crucial element in sustainably shoring up election cybersecurity for the future.

Read More

FCC Net Neutrality Repeal to Set Up Long Fight

Today, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is expected to vote along party lines to repeal the 2015 Open Internet Order, which provides a strong legal foundation for enforceable net neutrality rules. The Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT) has long supported rules that ensure an open internet, and today’s vote will dissolve these protections without an effective plan to…

Read More

The Voter Fraud Commission Wants Your Data — But Experts Say They Can’t Keep It Safe

ProPublica: “It blows my mind — this is complete operational security incompetence,” said Joe Hall, the chief technologist for the Center for Democracy & Technology, an organization that promotes internet freedom. “You should consider all of that stuff in the hands of people who are clever enough to intercept someone’s email.”

Read More

Why the Feds want to make it easier for them to get into your phone

Yahoo! News: In an Oct. 10 speech at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland., Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein made a case to step back from what the tech industry generally sees as an advance in security: “warrant-proof” encryption on devices that even court-authorized investigators can’t unlock. But granting that seemingly innocuous request could start to carve giant holes into your phone’s security.

Read More