Related Press Releases

After London attacks, British prime minister calls for worldwide Internet regulations to fight terrorism

Washington Post: “May’s government now has incredible compulsory powers to do both targeted and bulk surveillance in her country,” said Michelle Richardson, deputy director of the Center for Democracy and Technology, a Washington-based think tank. “The only thing left you could seem to grab would be a complete surveillance state. If you’re proposing to go even further than the current authority, there’s not much you could do beyond that that isn’t an explicit attack on human rights.”

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NSA Halts Part of Invasive Surveillance Program, Need for Section 702 Reform Highlighted

The NSA is stopping a controversial part of its warrantless surveillance conducted under Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), which permits the targeting of non-U.S. persons outside the U.S. It reportedly abandoned the practice of collecting communications that merely mention an identifier associated with a target, such as an email address or telephone number. This “about” collection swept in many communications that involved Americans. NSA will continue to collect communications to which the target is actually a party. CDT has advocated against this form of untargeted surveillance.

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CDT Supports the Protecting Data at the Border Act

Today, Senators Wyden (D-OR) and Paul (R-KY) and Representatives Polis (D-CO), Farenthold (R-TX), Smith (D-WA), and Beyer (D-VA) introduced the Protecting Data at the Border Act, which would require the government to obtain a warrant to search the data of U.S. persons. CDT supports the bill and believes, as the bill’s sponsors say, that our “Constitutional rights shouldn’t disappear at the border.”

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Coalition Condemns DHS Proposal to Demand Passwords to Enter the U.S.

In a statement released today, a broad coalition rejected the idea proposed by DHS Secretary John Kelly that DHS could begin requiring visa applicants from certain countries to provide social media account passwords as a condition of entering the U.S. The practice of demanding social media passwords on visa application forms, which Secretary Kelly raised at a hearing before the House Homeland Security Committee on February 7th, 2017, would not increase the security of U.S. citizens and would jeopardize the fundamental rights of people in the U.S. and abroad.

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