Related Press Releases

U.S. House Renews FISA Authority to Spy on Americans

In a blow to Americans’ Fourth Amendment rights, the U.S. House of Representatives voted this morning to renew the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) for another six years. The bill passed today makes practically no meaningful reform to current surveillance law, which allows the government to conduct “backdoor searches” under Section 702 that target Americans’ communications.

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White House Releases Information On Vulnerability Equities Process

Today, White House Cybersecurity Coordinator Rob Joyce released information about the Vulnerability Equities Process (VEP), which determines whether the U.S. government discloses or exploits cybersecurity flaws that it finds or learns about in companies’ products and services. The complicated and important process has implications for cybersecurity, privacy, and economic competitiveness, and the Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT) has previously pushed for the process to be more transparent to the public.

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USA RIGHTS Act Offers Strong 702 Surveillance Reform

Today, the USA RIGHTS Act, which is aimed at reforming a secretive government surveillance program, was introduced in both the Senate and House of Representatives. The bipartisan bill, which would make major changes to Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), would create stronger protections for the rights of American citizens while also allowing intelligence agencies to conduct targeted surveillance. The Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT) supports the USA RIGHTS Act and believes it is the best proposal currently before Congress. Section 702 is set to expire at the end of 2017 unless Congress acts.

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Why the Feds want to make it easier for them to get into your phone

Yahoo! News: In an Oct. 10 speech at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland., Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein made a case to step back from what the tech industry generally sees as an advance in security: “warrant-proof” encryption on devices that even court-authorized investigators can’t unlock. But granting that seemingly innocuous request could start to carve giant holes into your phone’s security.

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Supreme Court to Decide Whether a U.S. Warrant Can Reach Emails Stored Overseas

Today, the Supreme Court agreed to hear arguments in a case focused on whether a U.S. warrant can reach emails stored overseas. The case, Microsoft v. United States, has major implications for the privacy rights of internet users both in the U.S. and abroad. The Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT) has filed briefs in the case in support of Microsoft’s position, arguing that the U.S. federal government must use the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty process to gain access to information stored outside of the U.S.

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Hack-vulnerable voting machines a 'national security threat,' experts warn

Newsweek: A new report breaks down the lessons learned at the DEF CON 25 hacking conference, which amounted to a concentrated attack—orchestrated in the name of public safety—on the programming and machinery used in U.S. elections. One of the authors of the report, Joseph Hall of the Center for Democracy & Technology, tweeted a warning against overinterpreting the scope of the threat, if not its urgency.

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Significant Surveillance Reforms in Section 702 Bill; Much More Must Be Added

Today, the Republican and Democratic heads of the House Judiciary Committee revealed the “USA Liberty Act,” legislation that would reform and reauthorize an important intelligence surveillance authority that would otherwise sunset on December 31. The legislation marks an important step forward, but it must do more to protect the rights of both U.S. and global citizens.

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Facebook 'likes' could land immigrants, naturalized citizens in trouble with fed

Detroit Free Press: According to legal and privacy experts, a DHS policy made public on Sept. 18 could send the country into uncharted territory when it comes to immigration protocol by targeting permanent residents and naturalized citizens for their online activities. Nuala O’Connor, director of the Washington, D.C.-based Center for Democracy & Technology, said that she is deeply concerned about the scope of inquiry given the Trump administration’s actions on immigration and that it’s uncertain how the policy will play out in practice.

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DHS Rule Allowing Collection of Immigrant Social Media Information is an Affront to Human Dignity

The Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT) is disappointed with the recently published Department of Homeland Security (DHS) rule that will expand the information DHS says it collects on immigrants to include social media handles and aliases, search results, and “associated identifiable information.” The rule, which takes effect on Oct. 18, 2017, will apply to lawful permanent residents, naturalized U.S. citizens, their relatives and associates, and many who assist in immigration proceedings.

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