Related Press Releases

Instagram Account That Sought Harassment Tales May Be Unmasked

New York Times: “The reason that people are making these sorts of accounts anonymously is because of the fear of reprisal that they face — that’s a key part of why we have a First Amendment right to anonymous speech,” Emma Llansó said. “On the other hand, defamation and untrue statements that are damaging to people’s reputations are also something our laws protect against.”

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Supreme Court Rules on Location Privacy

The Supreme Court ruled that law enforcement officers must have a warrant in order to obtain historic cell site location information. In one of the most widely-anticipated decisions in a blockbuster year for the Supreme Court, the Court found 5-4 in Carpenter v. U.S. that collecting 127 days of cell site location information requires a warrant. The Court rejected the government’s argument that the third-party doctrine, which holds that an individual loses Fourth Amendment protections in data voluntarily shared with a third party, nullified the warrant requirement.

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Apple's Health App Update Makes Keeping Track of Your Medical Records Way Easier

SELF: Apple’s most recent release, iOS 11.3 beta, includes a major addition to the Apple Health app: a Health Records feature that lets customers pull up their medical records on their phones whenever they want. Per the press release from Apple, the data will be encrypted and protected via the passcode on your phone. But Michelle De Mooy tells SELF that even with these measures, it’s “not possible” for Apple (or any company) to mitigate every security risk that accompanies this kind of data storage.

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Facebook 'likes' could land immigrants, naturalized citizens in trouble with fed

Detroit Free Press: According to legal and privacy experts, a DHS policy made public on Sept. 18 could send the country into uncharted territory when it comes to immigration protocol by targeting permanent residents and naturalized citizens for their online activities. Nuala O’Connor, director of the Washington, D.C.-based Center for Democracy & Technology, said that she is deeply concerned about the scope of inquiry given the Trump administration’s actions on immigration and that it’s uncertain how the policy will play out in practice.

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DHS Rule Allowing Collection of Immigrant Social Media Information is an Affront to Human Dignity

The Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT) is disappointed with the recently published Department of Homeland Security (DHS) rule that will expand the information DHS says it collects on immigrants to include social media handles and aliases, search results, and “associated identifiable information.” The rule, which takes effect on Oct. 18, 2017, will apply to lawful permanent residents, naturalized U.S. citizens, their relatives and associates, and many who assist in immigration proceedings.

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Passing Through Airport Security With the Touch of a Finger

New York Times: A company called Clear is using fingerprints and iris scans to spare some passengers the first phase of the T.S.A.’s security airport screening process — the document-verification checkpoint and its line. Clear says it can speed fliers through checkpoints while maintaining tight security. But the rollout process has been slow — Clear is available only in some terminals at 24 domestic airports — an earlier iteration of the company had a data security issue.

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