Related Press Releases

Can EU-US data pact survive without surveillance reform?

Christian Science Monitor: The deal would introduce the idea of “essential equivalence” between how privacy laws are interpreted and applied in the EU and in the US, said Chris Calabrese, vice president for policy at the Center for Democracy and Technology, a tech advocacy group in Washington. But it does not eliminate the government’s authority to force American firms to disclose data under the aegis of counter-terrorism. And that could be a problem from the EU Court of Justice’s point of view, said Mr. Calabrese.

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Passage of Judicial Redress Act a Small Victory for Global Privacy Rights

Today, the House of Representatives passed the Judicial Redress Act (JRA), which extends some protections in the Privacy Act to some non-US citizens. The JRA specifically addresses records shared by European Union and otherwise-designated countries with US government agencies for the purpose of investigating, detecting, or prosecuting criminal offenses. Enactment of the Judicial Redress Act would represent a modest step forward for the privacy rights of non-US persons.

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Top European court rules that NSA spying makes U.S. unsafe for data

Intercept: Although the safe harbor provision applies to commercial data, the underlying issue is the overbroad access of U.S. intelligence agencies to European citizens data, said Jens-Henrik Jeppesen, director of European Affairs for the Center for Democracy and Technology. “Surveillance is the heart of this matter,” Jeppesen told The Intercept. “The highest court in the European Union is not satisfied with the guarantees such as they are under current U.S. laws.”

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EU Safe Harbour Ruling Should Reinvigorate Surveillance Reform Efforts

In a ruling that will reverberate across the tech sector and other industries in both the United States and Europe, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) ruled that the EU-US Safe Harbour agreement is invalid. The ruling, which is mostly a response to revelations about the US Government’s surveillance practices, complicates the legal framework for companies that transfer their users’ data under the agreement and should generate a new round of surveillance reform efforts in both the US and Europe.

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Strike Down Safe Harbour, Says CJEU Advocate General

Today, the Advocate General of the Court of Justice of the European Union concluded that the EU should suspend the Safe Harbour agreement it has with the United States. The Advocate General’s opinion turned on the vast scope of NSA surveillance. CDT shares in the Advocate General’s conclusion that US surveillance programmes violate the privacy rights of EU citizens, and recognises that suspension of data transfers under the Safe Harbour would do little or nothing to enhance protection against indiscriminate collection of data by security agencies.

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CDT Supports Microsoft’s Appeal to Government Demand for Data Stored Abroad

Today, a federal appeals court in Manhattan heard oral arguments in Microsoft’s challenge to the US government’s warrant to compel the company to disclose a customer’s email stored in a data center in Ireland. The Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT) believes that neither a warrant nor a subpoena is sufficient to reach data stored outside the US and sides with Microsoft in the case.

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National Journal: British Access to NSA Spying Was Illegal, Court Rules

The surprising rebuke could portend further legal challenges in Europe to the U.S. government’s international surveillance programs. A British court ruled Friday that the United Kingdom’s access to spying data collected by the National Security Agency was illegal until just two months ago, marking one of the sharpest legal rebukes of government surveillance in the post-Snowden era. The sharing arrangement was…

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CNN: How politicians are trying to break the Internet

CDT Free Expression Director, Emma Llanso, shares her thoughts from IGF Istanbul.   A stark warning about governments’ ability to abuse technology to muzzle citizens, track movements, and shut down peaceful protests has emerged at this week’s Internet Governance Forum in Istanbul. We are in a post-Snowden reality and his revelations of mass government surveillance programs continue to rattle people around…

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CDT & OTI urge Congress to reject bill on Internet governance

Washington – Today, the Center for Democracy & Technology joins the New America Foundation’s Open Technology Institute in a letter urging Congress to reject the current text of a House bill on Internet governance and rethink their approach to defending the existing model of Internet governance. The House Energy & Commerce Committee Subcommittee on Communications and Technology will consider…

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Consensus Crumbles as Nations Split on Internet Governance

Washington– The World Conference on International Telecommunications ended today with many delegates frustrated at the outcome. After nearly two weeks of contentious deliberations, the US, UK, Canada, Denmark, Australia and Czech Republic have declared that they will not sign the newly revised treaty of the International Telecommunication Union. A growing list of countries, currently including Poland, Kenya, Costa Rica, Serbia,…

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