Related Press Releases

Why the Feds want to make it easier for them to get into your phone

Yahoo! News: In an Oct. 10 speech at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland., Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein made a case to step back from what the tech industry generally sees as an advance in security: “warrant-proof” encryption on devices that even court-authorized investigators can’t unlock. But granting that seemingly innocuous request could start to carve giant holes into your phone’s security.

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Facebook 'likes' could land immigrants, naturalized citizens in trouble with fed

Detroit Free Press: According to legal and privacy experts, a DHS policy made public on Sept. 18 could send the country into uncharted territory when it comes to immigration protocol by targeting permanent residents and naturalized citizens for their online activities. Nuala O’Connor, director of the Washington, D.C.-based Center for Democracy & Technology, said that she is deeply concerned about the scope of inquiry given the Trump administration’s actions on immigration and that it’s uncertain how the policy will play out in practice.

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Passing Through Airport Security With the Touch of a Finger

New York Times: A company called Clear is using fingerprints and iris scans to spare some passengers the first phase of the T.S.A.’s security airport screening process — the document-verification checkpoint and its line. Clear says it can speed fliers through checkpoints while maintaining tight security. But the rollout process has been slow — Clear is available only in some terminals at 24 domestic airports — an earlier iteration of the company had a data security issue.

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GOP Data Firm Accidentally Leaks Personal Details of Nearly 200 Million American Voters

Gizmodo: Although files possessed by Deep Root would be typical in any campaign, Republican or Democratic, experts say its exposure in a single open database raises significant privacy concerns. “This is valuable for people who have nefarious purposes,” Joseph Lorenzo Hall, the chief technologist at the Center for Democracy and Technology, said of the data.

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After London attacks, British prime minister calls for worldwide Internet regulations to fight terrorism

Washington Post: “May’s government now has incredible compulsory powers to do both targeted and bulk surveillance in her country,” said Michelle Richardson, deputy director of the Center for Democracy and Technology, a Washington-based think tank. “The only thing left you could seem to grab would be a complete surveillance state. If you’re proposing to go even further than the current authority, there’s not much you could do beyond that that isn’t an explicit attack on human rights.”

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How to Keep Your Internet Browser History Private

Teen Vogue: Congress has sold out your browsing habits to advertisers, passing a law that allows internet service providers that provide your broadband connection to sell your data without asking for permission first. Protecting yourself isn’t as easy as many make it out. Here’s the steps you should take to keep your data from being gathered up and sold to the highest bidder.

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It's time for porn sites to embrace HTTPS

CIO: As long as you’re of legal age, visiting adult websites should be your own business. The reality is, however, very few adult sites offer high levels of security, and if someone snoops on your browsing habits they can see the pages you visit, the content you download, and the specific terms you search for.

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The Quest to Make Porn Sites More Secure

Wired: Today, the FSC and the Center for Democracy and Technology embark on a quest to make pornographic sites safer to browse. Together, they hope to bring the encryption protocol HTTPS to online porn, securing an incalculably large portion of the web along with it. The initial goal of the FSC and CDT partnership isn’t to force HTTPS on porn sites but to educate them as to its importance, and help with the transition.

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