Related Insights

Comments to the NHTSA on Federal Automated Vehicles Policy (November 22)

CDT recognizes the tremendous societal benefits that may be derived from autonomous technologies, and we encourage NHTSA to further explore the privacy and cybersecurity impacts of AVs. Specifically, these comments focus on the Federal Automated Vehicles Policy’s Cross-Cutting Guidance with respect to: (1) data sharing; (2) privacy; (3) cybersecurity; and (4) consumer education and training.

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CDT's Priorities for the New Administration

At the Center for Democracy & Technology, we believe that there are core beliefs that unite every American. Our policy recommendations for the nation’s 45th president are moderate, pragmatic proposals aimed at charting a forward-looking course that protects our individual rights, keeps the country secure, and enables further innovation in our hyper-connected reality.

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Comments to the EEOC on the Implications of Big Data in Employment

CDT commends the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s effort to protect equal opportunity in employment by examining how the collection and use of data may exacerbate structural inequality. In particular, we urge the Commission to scrutinize the use of automated decision-making systems in hiring, management, and employee evaluation practices and to ensure that such systems promote fairness, equality, and diversity.

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Content ‘responsibility:’ The looming cloud of uncertainty for internet intermediaries

This paper, written by Dr. Monica Horten, addresses the topic of intermediary liability in the context of new European Union policy proposals. These proposals introduce a new notion of ‘content responsibility’. The paper seeks to understand this notion and its consequences by analysing the policy proposals that have been tabled in 2016, as well as national and European case law.

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Coalition Letter Opposing DHS Social Media Collection Proposal

A coalition of human rights and civil liberties organizations, including CDT, sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to express their concerns with a proposal that certain categories of visitors to the United States be asked to disclose information about their “online presence” in their visa-waiver arrival/departure records (Form I-94W) and their online application for an Electronic System for Travel Authorization.

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Comments to DHS on Proposal to Ask Visa Waiver Applicants for Social Media Identifiers

The Department of Homeland Security proposes to request disclosure of social media identifiers and other online account information from Visa Waiver Program applicants. CDT is deeply concerned that this proposal would invade the privacy and chill the freedom of expression of visitors to the United States and United States citizens.

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Comments on FBI’s Proposed Exemption from the Privacy Act for Next Generation Identification System

The Center for Democracy and Technology (“CDT”) respectfully submits these comments urging the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (“FBI”) to reconsider the proposal in CPCLO Order No. 003-2016 to broadly exempt the Next Generation Identification (“NGI”) biometric system1 from key provisions of the Privacy Act of 1974.2 CDT also offers comments on the modified system of records notice in CPCLO Order No. 002-2016.

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Protecting Broadband Privacy, FCC Reply Comments

The Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT) respectfully submits these reply comments in response to the public comments filed as part of the Federal Communications Commission’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) regarding proposed rules to protect the privacy of customers of broadband and other telecommunications services. CDT is a nonprofit public interest organization dedicated to promoting openness, innovation, and…

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Workplace Privacy: State Legislation & Future Technology Questions

Digital technology has fundamentally and forever changed the way we share information about ourselves – but has also raised many complicated questions about the definition of privacy generally, and it has diminished our ability to keep separate personas at work and at home, “IRL” versus online. This creates a need for us to define what it means to have privacy in the relationship between employers and their employees, and to create a culture of workplace privacy, which state legislators are now attempting to do.

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