Related Insights

Coalition Letter Opposing DHS Social Media Collection Proposal

A coalition of human rights and civil liberties organizations, including CDT, sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to express their concerns with a proposal that certain categories of visitors to the United States be asked to disclose information about their “online presence” in their visa-waiver arrival/departure records (Form I-94W) and their online application for an Electronic System for Travel Authorization.

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Comments to DHS on Proposal to Ask Visa Waiver Applicants for Social Media Identifiers

The Department of Homeland Security proposes to request disclosure of social media identifiers and other online account information from Visa Waiver Program applicants. CDT is deeply concerned that this proposal would invade the privacy and chill the freedom of expression of visitors to the United States and United States citizens.

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Comments on FBI’s Proposed Exemption from the Privacy Act for Next Generation Identification System

The Center for Democracy and Technology (“CDT”) respectfully submits these comments urging the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (“FBI”) to reconsider the proposal in CPCLO Order No. 003-2016 to broadly exempt the Next Generation Identification (“NGI”) biometric system1 from key provisions of the Privacy Act of 1974.2 CDT also offers comments on the modified system of records notice in CPCLO Order No. 002-2016.

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Protecting Broadband Privacy, FCC Reply Comments

The Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT) respectfully submits these reply comments in response to the public comments filed as part of the Federal Communications Commission’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) regarding proposed rules to protect the privacy of customers of broadband and other telecommunications services. CDT is a nonprofit public interest organization dedicated to promoting openness, innovation, and…

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Workplace Privacy: State Legislation & Future Technology Questions

Digital technology has fundamentally and forever changed the way we share information about ourselves – but has also raised many complicated questions about the definition of privacy generally, and it has diminished our ability to keep separate personas at work and at home, “IRL” versus online. This creates a need for us to define what it means to have privacy in the relationship between employers and their employees, and to create a culture of workplace privacy, which state legislators are now attempting to do.

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CDT and Fitbit Report on Best Privacy Practices for R&D in the Wearables Industry

R&D teams in wearable technology can and should also be laboratories of privacy and ethical research best practices. Some companies, such as Fitbit, leverage the talent and expertise on their teams to embed privacy into their technology. Through collaboration with Fitbit, the Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT) examined the procedures and practices within internal R&D teams that result in positive experiences for users, while improving the analytics and hardware behind the technology. Through interviews, surveys, and other research, CDT gained insight into industry-wide trends and best practices.

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Comments on Updates to the ONC Voluntary Personal Health Record Model Privacy Notice

Privacy questions arise due to the volume and sensitivity of health data generated by consumer-focused apps, devices, and platforms, including the potential analytics uses that can be made of such data. Transparency about data practices is essential not just as a fundamental element of privacy, but is also key to engendering consumer trust, which in turn is critical to the adoption of these services. Without trust, consumers will resist using apps or devices and the industry as a whole will suffer. Overall, transparency practices should be guided by the principle that the consumer should not be surprised. The more unexpected or potentially objectionable a data collection or usage is, the greater the obligation to explain it to consumers.

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Letter to House of Representatives leadership opposing H.R. 2666

Dear Speaker Ryan and Leader Pelosi –– The undersigned organizations strongly urge you to oppose H.R. 2666, the “No Rate Regulation of Broadband Internet Access Act.” A broad coalition wrote to you this week detailing the many ways this legislation would undermine the public interest and the Open Internet; we are particularly concerned about the bill’s impact on consumer privacy.

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CDT Letter on Employee Privacy Legislation

CDT is pleased that policymakers are addressing the issue of employee privacy. Technological advancements have increased efficiency in the modern workplace but also blurred the lines between personal and work life. The availability of fine-grained information about individuals, such as their location, their activity levels, or their online habits, have made it tempting for employers to monitor their employees in a way that erodes an individual’s ability to control the collection, use, and sharing of her personal information. Economic fair play, as well as the dignity of the individual, is at stake when her privacy is infringed upon in the workplace. We agree that codifying protections for employees is necessary and write to share our perspective and recommendations for how model legislation can be responsive to current, and near-future, workplace technology trends.

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