Related Insights

Mixed Messages? The Limits of Automated Social Media Content Analysis

This paper explains the capabilities and limitations of tools for analyzing the text of social media posts and other online content. It is intended to help policymakers understand and evaluate available tools and the potential consequences of using them, and focuses specifically on the use of natural language processing (NLP) tools for analyzing the text of social media posts.

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CDT Statement to House​ ​Judiciary​ ​Subcommittee​ ​on​ ​Net​ ​Neutrality​ ​and​ ​the​ ​Role​ ​of​ ​Antitrust

The​ ​Center​ ​for​ ​Democracy​ ​&​ ​Technology​ ​(CDT)​ ​thanks​ ​the​ ​Subcommittee​ ​for​ ​the​ ​opportunity​ ​to​ ​submit this​ ​statement​ ​regarding​ ​the​ ​November​ ​1,​ ​2017​ ​hearing​ ​on​ ​“Net​ ​Neutrality​ ​and​ ​the​ ​Role​ ​of​ ​Antitrust.” CDT​ ​appreciates​ ​the​ ​interest​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Subcommittee​ ​in​ ​protecting​ ​the​ ​principles​ ​of​ ​the​ ​open​ ​internet,​ ​but we​ ​have​ ​concerns​ ​about​ ​some​ ​of​ ​the​ ​legal​ ​and​ ​policy​ ​approaches​ ​under​ ​consideration​ ​in​ ​this​ ​hearing. In​ ​this​ ​statement,​ ​we​ ​will​ ​address​ ​some​ ​of​ ​the​ ​points​ ​raised​ ​by​ ​critics​ ​of​ ​the​ ​2015​ ​Open​ ​Internet​ ​Order (OIO)​ ​who​ ​argue​ ​for​ ​an​ ​alternative​ ​that​ ​relies​ ​exclusively​ ​on​ ​antitrust​ ​law.

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Letter to Senate Commerce Committee on Censorship Concerns with SESTA Manager's Amendment

The Honorable John Thune Chairman, Senate Commerce Committee United States Senate Washington, DC 20510 The Honorable Bill Nelson Ranking Member, Senate Commerce Committee United States Senate Washington, DC 20510 7 November 2017 Dear Chairman Thune, Ranking Member Nelson, and Members of the Committee, We, the undersigned human rights and civil liberties organizations, trade associations, and individuals write to convey our significant concern with the Manager’s Amendment to S.1693, the…

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Coalition Letter Opposing DHS Social Media Retention

A coalition of civil liberties organizations, including CDT, wrote to the Department of Homeland Security to express concerns with the DHS System of Records Notice, issued on September 18, 2017 that states that DHS will now store social media information in ‘Alien Files’, which include the official record of an individual’s visa and immigration history. Alien registration numbers, and their related A-File, are assigned to people who plan to make the United States their home, and also to certain categories of non-immigrants who are granted employment authorization.

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Summary of Meeting with the Digital Agenda Intergroup of the European Parliament

On 6 September 2017, the Digital Agenda Intergroup of the European Parliament and CDT held a closed roundtable on removing illegal content online while protecting human rights. This is a summary of the debate held under Chatham House rules. The event focused on challenges to existing intermediary liability limitations, and free expression, from the DSM Copyright Directive Art. 13, as well as the need for consistent and harmonized notice and action procedures across the EU.

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CDT’s 2017 Net Neutrality Reply Comments

In these reply comments, we respond to some of the claims raised by other commenters to support the NPRM. More specifically, we seek to clarify three underlying legal and policy misconceptions, focusing on assertions regarding the nature of the services provided by internet service providers (ISPs) and the scope of the relevant laws and regulations.

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Trade Secrets and Algorithms as Barriers to Social Justice

Various mechanisms in the current intellectual property (IP) system balance competing interests of the rightsholders with the societal needs of the public. Unauthorized copyright use is not considered infringement if the use made is “fair,” and patents require that innovations be described in detail to receive protection in order to promote the…

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Overview of the NetzDG Network Enforcement Law

The German parliament passed a law on 30 June that subjects social media companies and other providers that host third-party content to fines of up to €50 million if they fail to remove “obviously illegal” speech within 24 hours of it being reported. Here’s a review of the law with a focus on the free speech implications.

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