Related Posts

Civil Liberties Committee Defends Free Expression in AVMS Directive Debate

The European Parliament is amending the legislative proposal to reform the EU Audiovisual Media Services (AVMS) Directive. The Civil Liberties, Justice, and Home Affairs Committee (LIBE) of the European Parliament adopted earlier this month its Opinion on the review, which will be taken into account by the Culture and Education Committee (CULT) leading this debate in Parliament. We welcome LIBE’s Opinion, which, contrary to CULT’s draft Report, amongst other positive elements, highlights the importance of protecting freedom of expression and information in the context of a fast-evolving media landscape, maintaining the liability protections in the E-Commerce Directive, as well as ensuring prior judicial authorisation when determining the illegality of content, elements which we will continue to strongly advocate for in this debate.

Read More

The Needs of the 21st Century Creator

Copyright is a vital source of economic empowerment and entrepreneurship that needs to be utilized more by for 21st century content creators. Because the new generation of creators draws more heavily from copyrighted materials, it is imperative that they understand how to protect their creative works and promote copyright policies that affect the platforms that host their work.

Read More

Reservoir Clogs: Copyright and the Public Domain

CDT is taking part in Copyright Week, a series of actions and discussions supporting key principles that should guide copyright policy. We’re taking one element of the law and addressing what’s at stake, and what we need to do to make sure that copyright promotes creativity and innovation.

Read More

An Unjust Repeat Infringer Case

The dispute between music publisher BMG and Cox Communications has proven to be a standout Digital Millennium Copyright Act case. What the case comes down to is whether internet access providers are required to have a “repeat infringer” policy that removes customers that have engaged in copyright infringement. The court should account for the current realities of internet access and the internet’s significance to economically and socially disadvantaged communities.

Read More

Improving Section 1201

The Copyright Office has initiated a policy study focused on Section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), which prohibits the circumvention of technological protection measures (TPMs). CDT commented in the initial phase of this study, and recently commented again in response to the Office’s request for additional comments. The Copyright Office is right to take a hard look at Section 1201, which very much needs updating to protect security researchers

Read More

Blurring the Lines in Music Copyright Will Hurt Artists and Online Hosts

In the copyright infringement verdict against artists Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams, a jury found the music duo guilty of copying the “total concept and feel” of Marvin Gaye’s 1977 hit song, “Got to Give It Up.” This holding creates the potentially dangerous notion that copyright extends past protectable elements such as melody to cover more ambiguous fields like “vibe,” “groove,” and “feel,” and could lead to significant repercussions in an era of takedowns.

Read More

EU Copyright Proposals: Do Two Wrongs Make an Ancillary Right?

Copyright reform is one part of the EU Commission’s efforts to develop a Digital Single Market (DSM) for Europe, a vision of a robust digital economy with fewer borders and in which European creators and businesses can thrive. Leaked drafts of the Impact Assessment analyzes the predicted outcomes of the various reform proposals around copyright in light of the goals of the DSM Strategy. Unfortunately, both the proposals and the analysis raise some troubling issues.

Read More

Look It Up: Carla Hayden is Qualified

Dr. Carla Hayden understands technology and its interaction with libraries. She is passionate about using technology to modernize the collection and digitize its assets to increase access to the Library. She wants to make sure digitized materials are accessible in formats that will allow people with visual disabilities to access them. She believes in the value of free access to information, and protecting the privacy of library users. If our Senators want to be able to send their staffers to the library to “look it up,” they should confirm Dr. Hayden as the Librarian of Congress without further delay.

Read More

European Commission Online Platform Proposals Puts Onus on Companies

The European Commission has published a set of proposals and documents under the umbrella of its Digital Single Market strategy. Among them is a Communication on ‘Online Platforms and the Digital Single Market Opportunities and Challenges for Europe’. There are positive messages in the document, but also some problematic ones. CDT has consistently pushed back on proposals that would endanger the internet as an enabler of free expression, public debate, and access to information.

Read More

CDT Comments to Copyright Office Focus on Preserving Balance and Cooperation in the DMCA

CDT and the R Street Institute filed comments in response to the Copyright Office’s Notice of Inquiry regarding Section 512 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Section 512 protects the conduits, websites, cloud storage providers, and search engines from statutory damages and other liability for copyright infringement based on works posted by users so long as service providers comply with certain requirements. CDT very much hopes that the Office does not lose sight of the importance of that flexibility and balance as it evaluates the many proposals for change it will receive.

Read More