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Ismail Ajjawi’s Fundamental Free Speech & Association Rights Trampled by U.S. Customs and Border Protection

The case of Harvard freshman Ismail Ajjawi’s visa being revoked is deservedly receiving national attention. It is outrageous and unacceptable that this student would have to answer for the online activity of others, and potentially be denied entry because of such activity. However, this is the predictable and natural consequence of the President’s demand that immigrants face “extreme vetting” and the federal government’s decision to include social media screening as a part of this mandate.

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Clearing Up Misinformation about Section 230

Section 230 creates the breathing room not only for direct competitors to today’s dominant sites for user-generated content, but also for the development of completely alternative models for interactive online services. Policymakers who talk about amending Section 230 need to understand these fundamental principles first.

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Advocate General Opinion in Austrian Defamation Case Raises Troubling Prospects for Access to Information

Courts across Europe are grappling with difficult issues concerning content posted online. A recent opinion from the Advocate-General of the CJEU raises troubling prospects for free expression and access to information online. The AG opinion is not a final ruling, but the Court often follows the direction set by the AG. In this instance, the court should think twice.

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The Thorny Problem of Content Moderation and Bias

There is widespread confusion about how online platforms work and plenty of discord around how we want them to work. What do we want content moderation to look like in the digital age, what are the current problems with moderation on large platforms, and how do we start to address them? We will probably never see all people agree about how to address “difficult” speech on platforms, but access to better information about how content moderation works would enable us to have more informed conversations about what the real problems are and how we want to address them.

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Georgia’s Governor Vetoes Harmful School Safety Bill

The vetoing of the SB 15 bill gives the legislature a chance to reconsider how using data and technology to implement overbroad surveillance measures in schools could undermine the goal of keeping all students safe. CDT has highlighted what is missing from the school safety conversation, so it is our hope that the legislators will take this chance to focus on proven school safety strategies that consider the interests of all students.

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