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CBP Letter Prompts the Question: Is DHS Criminalizing Compassion and Association?

Authorities at the U.S. border are arguing that journalists who report on asylum seekers, and the lawyers and activists who advise them, are legitimate targets for investigation under 8 U.S. Code §1324 for the crime of illegally “encouraging” aliens to cross the border unlawfully. This alleged crime justifies the targeting of these individuals for surveillance, and may be tied to the search and detention of their electronic devices at ports of entry. That’s the message U.S. Customs and Border Protection delivered in a May 9th letter to the Center for Democracy & Technology, which responded to the coalition letter we sent the Department of Homeland Security about a pattern of enforcement activity that appears to target journalists, lawyers and activists associated with asylum seekers.

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House Set to Vote on Restoring Strong Net Neutrality Protections

This week, the Save the Internet Act (H.R. 1644) passed out of the House Energy and Commerce Committee with only minor amendments and is expected to see a floor vote as early as next week. The bill is the most direct way to restore important net neutrality protections and the FCC’s authority to enforce them. As the bill proceeds through the House and on to the Senate, CDT urges Congress to represent the will of their constituents, more than 80% of whom support the protections the Save the Internet Act would cement in place.

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Three Lessons in Content Moderation from New Zealand and Other High-Profile Tragedies

Details about how tech companies handled the shooter’s video and written manifesto, in combination with the public discourse on and reaction to the attacks, have made clear three fundamental facts about content moderation: automated content analysis is not a magic wand; the scale, speed, and iterative nature of online content is enormous; and we need much greater transparency.

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Copyright at the Supreme Court

The Supreme Court issued two unanimous decisions related to copyright. Although neither is likely to reshape the world of copyright, the Court’s opinions should at least provide more certainty for copyright litigants in the future.

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