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UK Draft Investigatory Powers Bill Would Not Provide Sufficient Oversight of Surveillance

Recent judgments from the European Court of Human Rights strongly suggest that the United Kingdom’s draft Investigatory Powers Bill would – if adopted – violate the European Convention on Human Rights by providing insufficient oversight. Amending the draft Bill to require independent judicial authorization for surveillance warrants would strengthen oversight.

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Did the European Court of Human Rights Just Outlaw “Massive Monitoring of Communications” in Europe?

Over the past two years, a trio of high-profile cases before the European Court of Human Rights that concern the United Kingdom’s large dragnet surveillance programs—and the country’s collaboration with the NSA—have become the focus of many activists’ hopes that the Court will effectively outlaw indiscriminate surveillance in Europe once and for all. With yesterday’s release of a judgment in a little-known case against Hungary, it turns out that the Court may effectively have just done exactly that.

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From Self-Help “Skeet Shooting” to DHS Guidance for Law Enforcement: Regulation of Drones Is a Bumpy Ride

When William Merideth allegedly witnessed an Unmanned Aircraft System (a.k.a. “drone”) hovering over his property while his 16-year-old daughter sunbathed in the garden, he promptly took out his 12-gauge shotgun and blew it out of the sky. In the wake of the subsequent criminal charges against him, the self-proclaimed “Drone Slayer” proudly…

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Replacing the Safe Harbor – Robust privacy protections in a new EU-US data transfer agreement

Much has been written and said about the Decision by the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) in the Schrems case, invalidating the European Commission’s Safe Harbor Decision, and its implications. Recently, EU and US negotiators have briefed the press and stakeholders about the progress towards a new data transfer agreement to replace the defunct Safe Harbor decision. A…

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Cybersecurity Information Sharing In the “Ominous” Budget Bill: A Setback for Privacy

Overall, the “compromise” that lawmakers came up with took the bad parts of the three bills on the table and, in many cases, made them worse. Unfortunately, the Cybersecurity Act of 2015 will probably become law, because any “nay” votes at this stage would be against the entire budget deal. There are, however, significant privacy costs built into this legislation.

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CDT Proposes Privacy Best Practices for Drones

Drones are a promising technology with great commercial and social potential. Since drones can also operate as a flying platform for sophisticated sensors – such as hi-res cameras, facial and license plate recognition, or cell tower emulators – drones can also erode individual privacy. CDT is proposing comprehensive voluntary privacy best practices for private use of drones, with the goal of credibly safeguarding individual privacy while enabling a wide range of private drone uses.

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Awaiting the Rushed Cyber Bill's Final Language: What We Hope to See

The final text of a cyber information sharing bill is expected to be released any minute now. According to recent reports, lawmakers hope to wrap up official conference negotiations sometime this week, and expect to send the final bill to the President’s desk as part of an omnibus budget deal by the end of this year. When the final conference report is released, CDT hopes that it contains the following protective measures.

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Finding Solutions to Privacy and Security Challenges in the On-Demand Economy

Many of the companies that are pioneers in the “on-demand” space are proving popular around the globe, but as these companies enter into traditionally regulated spaces, questions about the user privacy and security are cropping up – for both providers and consumers. Importantly, these companies often have far more data on consumers than traditional entities. As a result of this mass amount of new data, a number of vital questions must be addressed.

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