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A “Smart Wall” That Fails to Protect Privacy and Civil Liberties Is Not Smart

Congress needs to be smart about this “smart wall.” CBP’s history of grossly mismanaging technology projects, and its liberal use of surveillance tools beyond the physical border, caution against a hands-off approach. Any funding Congress provides to invasive border surveillance technologies should be conditioned on efficacy requirements and limitations on use that are designed to preserve the human and civil rights of those against whom they will be used.

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CBP’s Border Searches Struggle to Comply with Constitution and Agency Policy

An Inspector General audit of Custom and Border Protection’s controversial border searches of electronic devices revealed that the agency overwhelmingly struggles to conduct searches that comport with the Constitution and agency protocol. In 2019, CDT will encourage Congress to take an active role on this issue and will encourage the passage of legislation protecting the privacy of all travelers at the border as well as the inclusion of further transparency requirements.

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Dockless Mobility Pilots Let Cities Scoot Away with Sensitive Data

Dockless mobility services generate a tremendous amount of data that can potentially improve transportation infrastructure, and cities like Detroit and Los Angeles are racing to create new data standards to collect and analyze mobility data. Building on our earlier work on government data demands, CDT has called on transportation authorities to adopt clear and robust privacy and security safeguards. These policies should build off of longstanding Fair Information Practices, include appropriate access controls, and address the availability of mobility data to researchers.

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Data Provided to HHS to Vett Sponsors of Unaccompanied Children Should Not Be Repurposed for Immigration Enforcement

Information originally provided in connection with the sponsorship of an unaccompanied minor entering the U.S. without lawful status is being used to remove the sponsor (or family members) from the U.S. CDT joined 112 organizations to demand that DHS and HHS stop the inhumane and illegal policy of questioning vulnerable immigrant children about their family and using that information to find, arrest, and try to deport their parents and relatives when they come forward to assume responsibility for the children.

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