Related Posts

Tech Talk: IoT Liability, ICE Those License Plate Readers

CDT’s Tech Talk is a podcast where we dish on tech and Internet policy, while also explaining what these policies mean to our daily lives. In this episode, we talk about liability and the Internet of Things – who should be held accountable if something goes seriously wrong? We also look into ICE’s use of a massive license plate reader database and address what the public needs to know.

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As Device Searches at Border Grow, Courts Must Step in to Safeguard Constitutional Protections

On February 2, CDT filed an amicus brief in Alasaad v. Nielsen arguing that warrantless, suspicionless border searches of electronic devices such as laptops and cell phones violate the First and Fourth Amendments to the Constitution. Digital—we argue—is different, and the need to address these border searches is pressing because digital content is becoming far more prevalent.

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ICE Accesses Commercial License Plate Reader Database—We Want Access to ICE

The United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency recently issued a contract request for query-based access to a commercial license plate reader database. We filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request with ICE seeking information on the contract, as well as any internal training materials, policy memos, and documents related to how ICE agents plan to use the commercial database and LPR data.

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CDT Argues Against Extraterritorial Warrants in Microsoft-Ireland Brief

CDT argued in an amicus brief filed with the U.S. Supreme Court in the Microsoft-Ireland case that warrants issued by U.S. courts cannot compel the disclosure of communications content stored outside the United States. We explain in the brief that a contrary rule authorizing extraterritorial U.S. warrants would be an open invitation to foreign governments to insist that their own legal process compels the disclosure of data stored in the United States. This would create chaos at the expense of privacy. We also explain that authorizing the U.S. government to compel the disclosure of data stored abroad would damage the cloud computing industry by reducing trust. 

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