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Dockless Mobility Pilots Let Cities Scoot Away with Sensitive Data

Dockless mobility services generate a tremendous amount of data that can potentially improve transportation infrastructure, and cities like Detroit and Los Angeles are racing to create new data standards to collect and analyze mobility data. Building on our earlier work on government data demands, CDT has called on transportation authorities to adopt clear and robust privacy and security safeguards. These policies should build off of longstanding Fair Information Practices, include appropriate access controls, and address the availability of mobility data to researchers.

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Data Provided to HHS to Vett Sponsors of Unaccompanied Children Should Not Be Repurposed for Immigration Enforcement

Information originally provided in connection with the sponsorship of an unaccompanied minor entering the U.S. without lawful status is being used to remove the sponsor (or family members) from the U.S. CDT joined 112 organizations to demand that DHS and HHS stop the inhumane and illegal policy of questioning vulnerable immigrant children about their family and using that information to find, arrest, and try to deport their parents and relatives when they come forward to assume responsibility for the children.

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OMB Should Deny State Department’s Proposal to Collect Social Media Identifiers from 14.7 Million Visa Applicants

In August the State Department (DOS) submitted its proposal to collect social media identifiers used in the last five years from 14.7 million immigrant and nonimmigrant visa applicants to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for approval. CDT has consistently worked with coalition partners to challenge these programs by filing and joining comments in opposition highlighting its detrimental impact on free speech, association, as well as other issues detailed below.

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Face Recognition Principles are a Step Forward But Congress Needs to Act

Companies are eager to deploy face tracking for their own ends, but FRTs have the potential to significantly alter our day-to-day existence in the public square. Companies and retailers should provide much more detail about their biometric data practices, and as Congress and the White House begin to discuss the contours of a federal baseline privacy law, facial recognition technologies deserve special attention.

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