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UK House of Commons Poised to Approve a Pernicious Surveillance Bill

The House of Commons is about to approve legislation that could make surveillance in the UK ubiquitous, and powerful surveillance authorities unaccountable. Also, by serving as a model for the rest of the world, it puts human rights at risk everywhere. This post outlines major problems with the legislation, about which CDT has submitted evidence (public comments). Yet, these make up only a small portion of the Bill’s shortcomings.

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UK Draft Investigatory Powers Bill Would Not Provide Sufficient Oversight of Surveillance

Recent judgments from the European Court of Human Rights strongly suggest that the United Kingdom’s draft Investigatory Powers Bill would – if adopted – violate the European Convention on Human Rights by providing insufficient oversight. Amending the draft Bill to require independent judicial authorization for surveillance warrants would strengthen oversight.

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Did the European Court of Human Rights Just Outlaw “Massive Monitoring of Communications” in Europe?

Over the past two years, a trio of high-profile cases before the European Court of Human Rights that concern the United Kingdom’s large dragnet surveillance programs—and the country’s collaboration with the NSA—have become the focus of many activists’ hopes that the Court will effectively outlaw indiscriminate surveillance in Europe once and for all. With yesterday’s release of a judgment in a little-known case against Hungary, it turns out that the Court may effectively have just done exactly that.

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Replacing the Safe Harbor – Robust privacy protections in a new EU-US data transfer agreement

Much has been written and said about the Decision by the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) in the Schrems case, invalidating the European Commission’s Safe Harbor Decision, and its implications. Recently, EU and US negotiators have briefed the press and stakeholders about the progress towards a new data transfer agreement to replace the defunct Safe Harbor decision. A…

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CJEU General Advocate Opinion in Schrems Case A Wake-Up Call

“The EU should suspend the ‘Safe Harbor’ agreement with the US.” This is one of the conclusions of the Advocate General of the Court of Justice of the EU, in his 23 September opinion on the ‘Schrems case’, and the one that has drawn the most headlines. However, the reality is that if the CJEU were to follow the AG’s guidance and strike down the Safe Harbour Agreement, it would do little.

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UN Member States Call for US Surveillance Reforms

Last week, the UN Human Rights Council conducted the Universal Periodic Review (“UPR”) of the United States. The Administration should give immediate and serious consideration to countries’ recommendations to recognize that human rights apply to all surveillance; that any surveillance program must be subject to adequate judicial, congressional, and independent oversight; and that anyone whose fundamental rights are violated by surveillance activities must have access to effective redress.

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US to Answer for Surveillance Practices on Global Stage

It only happens once every four and a half years, but it’s about to happen this month: the United States will appear before the assembled United Nations Member States to listen and respond to critiques of its human rights record. CDT has been working hard to ensure that the US’ surveillance practices are at the top of the agenda for this process, which is known as the Universal Periodic Review (“UPR”). We hope the official comments aired during the session will help to reinforce strong human rights standards around government surveillance and hold the US to account for its abuses.

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Digital India’s Impact on Privacy: Aadhaar numbers, biometrics, and more

Much of the discussion at the recent India-U.S. Information and Communications Technologies Working Group focused on the Indian government’s “Digital India” initiative to promote universal connectivity, with the goal of providing every citizen with broadband connection by December 2016. As part of a “cradle-to-grave digital identity” for its citizens, the government plans to draw on the Aadhaar program, a controversial unique identification system that has led the Indian government to create the world’s largest biometric database. Lisa discusses its privacy concerns and more.

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