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PASS ID Act Offers REAL Reforms

Today legislation was introduced in Congress to provide a much needed overhaul of the REAL ID program by Senators Akaka (D-HI), Baucus (D-MT), Carper (D-DE), Tester (D-MT), and Voinovich (R-OH) the new bill is known as the Providing for Additional Security in States' Identification (PASS ID) Act of 2009. Since its inception in 2005, REAL ID has long…

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Who’s on First?

There’s a lot of talk in the online privacy world about first parties and third parties. Generally speaking, when you surf to abc.com, that site is considered to be a first party during the time that you’re on the site. If abc.com contains ads, content, scripts, or other stuff being delivered by xyz.com, then xyz.com is considered a third…

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Personal Health Records: Who Are You Going to Trust?

Personal health records (PHRs) have the potential to move our health care system toward a more patient-centered model by enabling individuals to store and share copies of their health information. However, many consumers hesitate to use PHRs because of privacy concerns. These concerns are justified by the uncertainty that characterizes our current system: there…

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Email Privacy Rights, Electronic Search and Seizure Before Court

CDT recently signed on to an amicus brief being spearheaded by Electronic Frontier Foundation in the second round of United States v. Warshak, a case that could have major ramifications for email privacy rights and electronic search and seizure processes. The court is deciding whether the government can evade probable cause standards through the use of mandatory data…

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Gotta Know When to Fold ‘Em

In a win for free speech and openness online, the Minnesota Department of Public Safety has come to its senses and dropped its campaign to force ISPs in the state to block access to overseas gambling sites. The letter rescinding the earlier demand cited a lawsuit challenging the demand’s legality, filed by the Interactive…

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Buy a Computer, Get a Firewall… and More?

The Chinese government has quietly mandated that any personal computer sold in the country be pre-installed with government-approved software that blocks access to a government-created black list of “harmful” sites. The alleged intent of such a move is to protect children and provide them with a safer online environment. The question of how to do that effectively and not…

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FTC Nails a Bad Actor Internet Hosting Company

At the Anti-Spyware Coalition workshop two weeks ago, a common theme was how to ensure that law enforcement can work with companies and researchers to share information that could lead to effective enforcement actions. In fact, we launched the Chain of Trust Initiative, to develop avenues of collaboration on protecting the Internet from malicious actors. Brian Krebs’ keynote…

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The Open Government Dialogue Thus Far…

When the Open Government Dialog began on May 21st, we were waiting to see what kind of discussion would be fostered by the brainstorming process. As it turned out, almost 2,500 ideas were submitted and hundreds of thousands of votes were cast. There is even a transparency map that visually portrays the interconnection and complexity of the ideas…

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Chinese Voices Silenced (Again) as Tiananmen Media Blackout Begins

The Chinese government has blocked access to Twitter and a slew of other online platforms for expression in China on Tuesday. Users report that Twitter, Flickr, Bing.com, Hotmail, Windows Live, Blogger.com, and other services are unavailable. YouTube has also been largely blocked since March. The Chinese government often restricts access to online…

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